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2 edition of Drainage for increased crop production and a quality environment found in the catalog.

Drainage for increased crop production and a quality environment

National Drainage Symposium (3rd 1976 Chicago)

Drainage for increased crop production and a quality environment

proceedingsof the third National Drainage Symposium, Chicago, Dec. 13-14, 1976.

by National Drainage Symposium (3rd 1976 Chicago)

  • 306 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by American Society of Agricultural Engineers in St. Joseph, Michigan .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Drainage.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesASAE Publication -- 1-77
    ContributionsAmerican Society of Agricultural Engineers.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination148p. ;
    Number of Pages148
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21053721M

      Scientific research is showing that increased loads from heavy rainfall coupled with extensive drainage projects are tied to the prevalence of harmful algal blooms. Some communities offer payback to landowners to set aside wet areas. A current list of financial incentives is maintained by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. Chapter 1 discusses the potential to use saline waters, especially drainage waters, to increase crop production (particularly in those countries which are limited by available water supplies) while simultaneously helping to overcome environmental pollution .

      In , ISU established two projects to evaluate the impact of different cropping management practices on subsurface drainage water quality and crop yields. One study evaluated manure application timing (early fall vs. late) and cover crop effect on water quality .   Response to continuous soybean and cover crop varied by site (soil drainage class) with no interaction effects. Continuous soybean reduced yield only on well‐ and moderately well‐drained soil types. Cover crop reduced yield on the very poorly drained soil type and increased yield on the well‐drained soil type.

      But much of the drainage infrastructure has outlived its design life and was built for a different era in agriculture, when pastures and forage crops that require less drainage than grain crops were more commonly grown. Climate change has increased precipitation, further taxing the aging drainage infrastructure, Castellano said. Soil health is defined as, “the capacity of a specific kind of soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation” (Doran and Zeiss, ). From: Science of The Total Environment, Related terms.


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Drainage for increased crop production and a quality environment by National Drainage Symposium (3rd 1976 Chicago) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Artificial drainage is among the most widespread land improvements for agriculture. Drainage benefits crop production, but also promotes nutrient losses to water resources.

Here, we outline how a systems perspective for sustainable intensification of drainage can mitigate nutrient losses, increase fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and reduce greenhouse gas by: 6. improving crop production and the quality of runoff and subsurface drainage discharge in humid, semiarid, and arid areas.

We need different drainage systems to ensure efficient, environmentally sound crop production in all of these areas. Research goals— •. Jan van Schilfgaarde, Frank Engelund, Don Kirkham, Dean F.

Peterson Jr. and Marinus Maasland Theory of Land Drainage doi/agronmonogr7.c2. estimated that drainage could increase crop production on 31 million ha that are already partially drained and an additional 12 million ha of undrained cropland.

Impacts of Agricultural Drainage Well Closure on Crop Production: A Watershed Case Study Models can be used to (a) assess past hydrologic conditions and their effects on cropland drainage, (b) analyze the effectiveness and impact of alternative cropland drainage options, and (c) assess the cumula-tive impacts (environmental and socio-economic) of.

conditions. In the NC site, the crop yield increased by 9% in the very dry years, % in the dry years and % in the long term average. The drainage outflow was reduced by % in the very dry years and by % in the dry years. In the IL site, crop yield increased by % and % and the drainage. Environmental Benefits of Tile Drainage Page: 3 Table 1 B Effect of tile drainage on yields of five different crops Average Yield before tile drainage Average yield after tile drainage Crop Yield increase tonne/ha tonne/ha tonne/ha % Grain corn Soybeans Wheat Oats File Size: 83KB.

Drainage water management is a practice that shows great promise for reducing nitrate loading in the Midwest while maintaining drainage intensity during critical periods of the crop production cycle.

DWM uses water control structures to raise the effective height of the water table, and thereby manage the amount of drainage from a field. More Production Less Risk Cleaner Water.

Only release the amount of water necessary to ensure trafficable conditions for field operations and to provide an aerated crop root zone. Any drainage in excess of this rule likely carries away nitrates and water that is no longer available for crop uptake.

The Golden Rule of Drainage. when the drainage flow brings back into solution salts from the deeper soil layers. Both effects increase the salinity of the drainage effluent, which can have environmental effects both within the project area and downstream of it.

Acidification: Subsoil layers brought into contact with the air though drainage. Glacial processes in the Upper Midwest created an abundance of highly productive but poorly drained soils (Figure 1). While it’s improved agricultural production, drainage also affects hydrology, water quality and wetland habitats.

Agricultural Drainage Environmental Impacts Overview Many changes have occurred after the discovery of bird deaths and deformities at Kesterson Reservoir, which drains agricultural land in the San Joaquin Valley. Crop production Agricultural drainage Find guidance on agricultural drainage systems, including planning and design strategies, background about its impact, tools and calculators, regulations and more.

Subsurface drainage systems that incorporate both controlled drainage and subirrigation (CDSI) can improve crop production, N use efficiency, and reduce possible negative effects on the water quality through reduction of nitrate N entering into surface or groundwater systems (Drury et al., ; Fausey et al., ; Frankenberger et al., ).

Drainage water management (DWM) is a practice in which the outlet from a conventional drainage system is intercepted by a water control structure that effectively functions as an in-line dam, allowing the drainage outlet to be artificially set at levels ranging from the soil surface to the bottom of the drains as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Drainage systems provide hydrological shortcuts and are responsible for increased chemical losses to water resources. Some irrigation systems have resulted in drastic changes in river and estuarine ecosystems, as well as land degradation through salinization and sodium buildup, and have been sources of international conflict.

Under waterlogging conditions crop production can be efficiently improved by implementing an adequate drainage system(s), currently in existence on ~ Mha worldwide (mostly on hydromorphic and/or halomorphic soils).

Drainage water management (DWM) is associated with crop yield increases that, under certain conditions, potentially could offset implementation costs and increase farm profitability. Actual yield effects are highly variable and depend on site-specific characteristics. This technical brief presents a summary of observed DWM.

Agricultural and Environmental Impacts of Drainage. Jane Frankenberger, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Eileen Kladivko, Department of Agronomy. Introduction. Water is a vital resource for agriculture, Indiana ’s largest industry. The plentiful supply of water in most years helps make Indiana one of the nation’s leading agricultural states.

This chapter discusses the importance and effect of nitrogen on crop quality and health. Nitrogen is often the most limiting factor in crop production. Hence, application of fertilizer nitrogen results in higher biomass yields and protein yield and concentration in plant tissue is commonly increased.

Drainage has been and will continue to be an essential component of agricultural production. As the demand for increased food production on limited land resources grows, coupled with achieving environmental quality goals, the need for sound drainage research will continue to be important.The objective is to increase production efficiency, crop yields and profitability on naturally poorly drained agricultural lands.

Agricultural, environmental and socio-economic benefits of drainage The primary benefits of drainage go beyond the control of excess soil water and accumulation of excess salts in the crop root zone (Fausey et al.consider environmental impacts on biodiversity values, water quality and land degradation.

Clearing that significantly impacts on the environment is generally not supported. The DER native vegetation fact sheet 1 Native vegetation clearing legislation in Western Australia, outlines the intent of the clearing legislation in more detail.